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, the staggering impact of alzheimer's. one in three seniors will be stricken but there is a new device in the fight. >>> later, the price paid for one of the most iconic dresses ever worn by princess diana. >>> as we mentioned, there is news tonight on alzheimer's. new numbers paint a pretty stunning picture of what we are already facing here. that is that one in three americans over 65 dies with alzheimer's or some form of dementia. in total, nearly 5.5 million americans are living with it. that's up 39% in just the past decade. now in the meantime research continues, including thankfully an occasional breakthrough. our report from nbc's tom costello. >> reporter: at the ohio state university med center, a new approach to cutting through the fog of alzheimer's. surgeons fitted a patient with two pacemakers, the wires reaching deep into her brain. the patient isn't 78-year-old joe jester or his wife peggy. it's their 57-year-old daughter kathy, struggling with early onset alzheimer's. >> it's sad for peggy and i to go through this with a daughter, you know. especially when it should be
, the alzheimer's association revealed a new report revealing how deadly the disease is. one in three adults over the age of 65 dies with alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia. but what the support finds is dying with alzheimer's and dying from alzheimer's are two totally different things. experts say dementia can ultimately be the final push even if it isn't the direct cause of death. in the united states, alzheimer's is the sixth leading cause of death. >>> did you save anybody anyone's life today? it tess easier than you think. >> ask anyone who's donated blood. still only 10% eligible to donate do so. garvin thomas is here with tonight's bay area proud story about a south bay man working hard to raise that number. >> paul b. newman made a good point when we were talking. for all the advances in medicine, there's no widely available substitute for human blood. donations are literally a matter of life and death. what he's doing about it and why are at the heart of tonight's bay area proud. did you have an appointment today? >> new york i didn't. >> we're going to like your blood anyway
on polio. this is a caring story. we have another disease hurting us today. it is called alzheimer's. 5 million americans suffer from alzheimer's. that number is expected to triple in the next 40 years. the cost to deal with all simas today is about one and $72 billion -- which alzheimer's todayalzheimer's is about $172 billion. there is no known treatment for alzheimer's on the horizon. all of that $20 trillion will be spent on care because of humanitarian society. -- necessity. in much smarter and strategy would be to develop a cure. scientists tell us we could have a cure in 10 years for alzheimer's if we put our minds to it. why are we not seeking to cure diseases like alzheimer's or diabetes or cancer or parkinson's disease? how did we get to this point of political malpractice? ,ecause our government proclaiming to care so much, has traded a cadre of overzealous regulators, excessive taxation, and greedy litigators. that is not caring. it is time we care. [applause] we do not need a big government to develop these cures. we need big innovation, a big growth, the big ideas. that is
members involving alzheimer's and dementia. >>> and janelle wang joins us with our world tonight. >>> and we are live in rome as the pontiff delivers his inaugural mass. >>> the new way bay area doctors are able to reattach severed fingers. >>> it's a decision that changed his life. after he severed his finger in a freak accident an oakland man was told his only option was amputation. >> he decided to get a second opinion. marianne favro shows us how that decision paid off for him. >> not only was his finger reattached but he has full use of his hand that goes to a full procedure that uses nerves from a cadaver to spare patients from amputation. it is being used in military hospitals to help wounded soldiers but it is also helping bay area patients. >> at the top of the fence snagged my wedding ring and it tore all of the soft tissue off my finger. >> reporter: he remembers the day last summer when a freak accident severed his ring finger. he packed it in ice and headed to the e.r. where the doctor gave him one option. >> the only alternative was to have the whole thing cut off.
and suffers from alzheimer's disease. he was last seen around 1:30 yesterday when he went for a walk and did not return from the park. anyone with information is encouraged to call san jose police. >> breaking news from nevada where there was an explosion during a training exercise with the marines at the army depot two hours from free necessity. we are told a couple people are injured but officials are not providing an exact number. at least four medical helicopters transported patients to hospitals. the army depot is used for training for military units. >> new bart director says that it is time to revise the idea of extending bart north long the interstate 80 corridor. the "contra costa times" reports district seven director wants to bring bart to richmond, hilltop saying it makes sense to run long i-80 because the growth develops along the freeways. a competing idea extends it from the richmond bart station to the union pacific railroad corridor on the bay shore. amy hollyfield will have more in a live report next half hour. >> santa clara city leaders will sign off on a plan to offer mi
. it is called alzheimer's. five million americans suffer from alzheimer's and this number is expected to triple in the next 40 years. the cost to deal with alzheimer's today is $172 billion. the cost in 4 years to take care of alzheimer's is projected to be $20 trillion. that is a figure that is greater than our entire national debt today. by the way, there is no known treatment for alzheimer's on the horizon. all of that $20 trillion will be spent on care because it is a humanitarian necessity. we must take care of people. but a smarter strategy would be to develop a cure. that is caring. scientists tell us we can could have a cure in 10 years for alzheimer's if we only put our mind to it. why aren't we seeing to cure seases like alzheimer's, cancer, parkinson's disease? how did we get to this point of political malpractice? because our government proclaiming to care so much has -- overzell you regulators and greedy litigaters. that is not caring. it is time we care. [applause] we don't need a big government to develop these cures. what we need is big innovation, big growth, big ideas, that's
missing yesterday afternoon. the man is 90 years old and suffers from alzheimer's disease. he was last seen around 1:30 yesterday when he went for a walk at the park. anyone with information is encouraged to call san jose police. >> we are following breaking news from nevada. officials are being tightlipped about an explosion at the hawthorne military depot two hours outside of reno. the explosion happened last night during a marine corps training exercise. several people may have been injured. hawthorne arm to depot is used for disposing of army ammunition. >> pope francis has officially begun the watch over 1.2 billion catholics after the inauguration mass attended by world leaders this morning. he demonstrated a new kind of church leadership focused on the most needy. abc7 news reporter, katie marzullo, is live with the late it. katie is. >> pope francis making changes this morning. the gospel was read in greek and just six cardinals representing the entire college of cardinals pledged their obedience to the pope, rather than all of the cardinals attending. pope francis wanted a sho
't want. michael finney investigates >>> finding frtz alzheimer's association shows one in three adults over age 65 will zi from the disease or some form of dementia. the risk rose 39% between 2000 and 2010 according to the cdc. caucasians, women and those 85 and older are most at risk of dying from alzheimer's. researchers say living longer more deaths will be attributed to that disease as well. >> tonight a city council committee is going to be looking into expanding the smoking ban to three small parks. they include sarah wallace park and the california avenue business district. a staff report shows the city received complaints about the high level of smoking at the parks, smoking in palo alto is currently prohibiting in buildings open to the public, child care center asks service loxz more than 50% enclosed. >> san jess yeah soldier who's lost live fighting in vietnam will be honored in a new memorial. the monument black granite will feature names of 142 soldier who's died in the war the group built it so veteran who's lost loved ones will know sacrifice lbz remembered. >> the guy w
, a new report shows that the death rate for alzheimer's has skyrocketed over the past decades. why this is happening. the disturbing numbers coming right up. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." humans. we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back, offering exclusive products like optional better car replacement, where if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask an insurance expert about all our benefits today, like our 24/7 support and service, because at liberty mutual insurance, we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, so we do eve
many years ago when he was in alzheimer's, and he said to me if you want to get eternal, you got to go internal. >> well said. cardinal timothy dolan, your imminence, great to see you. >> maria your dad was a great man and wise man. >> very involved in the church. >> do they have reason to be hopeful? >> we all have reason to be hopeful with pope francis, my hope is on steroids after that magnificent mass and hearing him preach and i wonder, somebody in your interview hinted at it, that the new pope can't just be in to maintaining structures. he's got to unleash the energy that was given us by jesus and the holy spirit and i wonder if he's given us a new interpretive key in his homily. he spoke, i don't know if you had the advantage of hearing, of the translation, he spoke of tender love, tender love. now women are pros when it comes to tender love, and he spoke for st. joseph loving jesus and mary, but then he said this tender love has to go to creation, to god's creatures and especially to those who are most fragile, especially to those who are poor and struggling and feel alienated.
for the brain may counter the effect of alzheimer's and how wounded warriors are finding their footing on the slopes of colorado. >>> now keep it on this cancel for continuing news, sports, and more. >>> new details this morning about what may have led up to that deadly crash at a northern california raceway. >> down the block, they surrounded a white car. all jumped out of their cars, with the guns drawn. >>> plus, the investigation continues after a south bay officer opened fire and killed a driver they say refused to pull over. >>> and the pope installed early this morning in vatican city. we'll have a live report from st. peter's square, coming up. >>> and right now, a live look over san francisco. you can see the bay bridge over there in the distance. still very early. traffic smooth at this time of day on tuesday, march 19th. this is "today in the bay." >>> time to take you live to vatican city, where jay gray is, where the pope just got installed this morning. >> good morning, what is a beautiful and historic morning here in rome. still thousands in st. peter's square. hundreds
del mal del alzheimer, y esta cifra se podrÍa duplicar para el aÑo 2050 aunque no hay una cura, hay una esperanzadora noticia. >>> es una enfermedad triste que estÁ en experimentaciÓn. se utiliza un marcapasos en el cerebro. ♪ ♪ >>> cati libra una lucha contra alzheimer, y tomÓ la decisiÓn de ser la primera en recibir un macapasos como parte de un estudio aprobado por la fda. >>> no querÍa que otra persona pasara por la angustia que sufrÍ, y dije claro que lo harÉ. y para ver si funciona debe realizar pruebas con letras y figuras. segÚn su padre, la primera que las hizo tuvo dificultad para encontrar, pero al tocar este botÓn la mejorÍa es notable. >>> en este procedimiento el paciente se le conecta un macapasos similar al que se utiliza para el corazÓn, los alambres son implatados en el cerebro a travÉs de cirugÍa. >>> hacemos lo que hacemos un mapa del cerebro para encontrar el punto correcto donde se colocan estos diminutos micrÓfonos y podemos escuchar como las neuronas se comunican. es un sonido similar al de la estatica, en este procedimiento del centro mÉdi
for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. alzheimer's now affects half of us by age 85. my family tree is riddled with dementia and specifically alzheimer's disease. i don't want to get it. what can i do? the doctor says, "sit down. there is a gene. there's not much you can do about it." but let me tell you something. there is a lot that you can do. you can keep your brain in good working order. you can maintain these connections. the beginnings of memory loss could be at work right now, and you want to derail that process before it derails you. there are three steps, and in this program, we're going to take them one by one. it's easy. it's vitally important. [applause] hello and welcome. let me ask, what matters most to you? what's most important in your life? i'm guessing it's not your car, your clothing, or your house. what would you say is the most important thing in your life? your health? your family? your loved ones? well, what if it were to happen that you lost everything and everyone who is most important to you? not that they're go
to die with alzheimer's disease or other types of a dementia. experts with the alzheimer's association said that mind and destroying disease can speed death by interfering with treatments for heart disease, cancer or other serious illnesses. the organization is calling for additional funding to pay for future research. >> we will be right back. hello? the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. mcdonald's dollar menu, home of the meaty, melty mcdouble you love... ♪ ...and other amazing tastes, for just a dollar each. ♪ like the bold hot n spicy mcchicken, and the new grilled onion cheddar burger topped with caramelized onions and melted white cheddar. everyday, as always, there's a lot to love for a little on mcdonald's dollar menu. >> business owners and residents along san francisco's polk
on polio. this is a caring story. we have another disease that is hurting us today. it's called alzheimer's. 5 million americans suffer from alzheimer's, and we are learning that that number is expected to triple in the next 40 years. the cost to do with alzheimer's today is about $172 billion. the cost in 40 years, cumulatively to take of alzheimer's is projected to be $20 trillion. that's a figure that's greater than our entire national debt today. and by the way, there is no known treatment for alzheimer's on the horizon. so, all of that 20 trillion will be spent on care because it's a humanitarian necessity. we must take care of people. but a much smarter strategy would be to develop a cure. that's caring. scientists tell us that we could have a cure in 10 years for alzheimer's if we only put our mind to it. so why aren't we seeking to cure diseases like alzheimer's or diabetes, juvenile diabetes, heart disease, cancer, parkinson's disease? how did we possibly get to this point of political malpractice? because our government proclaiming to care so much has created a cadre of overzeal
into the database gold mine, and she thinks alzheimer's will be one of the diseases which will be better understood by what they find in the data bank. >> we don't have any way right now to treat alzheimer's. we don't have any way to prevent alzheimer's. so if we can understand what are the underlying pathways by which genes and environment interacting actually create the disease, then we have a chance to interrupt that process. >> reporter: researchers acknowledge that the promise of genetics to treat and potentially prevent disease is moving slower in some cases than initially expected. but schaefer and others are also convinced that genetics will play a vital role in determining which medicines can most benefit people. >> we actually are finding, for example, that genes are an important factor in how people respond to medications. so we're increasingly identifying wh are the genetic variants that are important when you're about to prescribe a medication for someone. >> reporter: medicine to lower high cholesterol-- statins-- are part of risch's studies. >> you know, if people take statins, we lo
version a "pretty reasonable solution." the number of americans dying from alzheimer's disease has increased by 68% in the last decade. according to the alzheimer's association, one in three seniors have some form of dementia when they die, and the disease accelerates the progression of other life- threatening conditions. because alzheimer's has no cure or treatment to slow symptoms, a growing elderly population means dementia mortality rates will only continue to rise. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: pope francis formally took office today with a special mass and ceremonies. we begin with a report from james mates of independent television news in rome. >> it was among the ordinary pilgrims to st. peter's that pope francis started his day. it is common now for a pope to kiss babies-- less so for them to get out of the popemobile and walk over to give a blessing to a disabled person. inauguration mass at st. peter's square was less or nate than in the past but it could not be described as either simple or understated. heads of state, all thei
a comfortable old age. you are also seeing in terms of epidemics, an increase in alzheimer's and it is going to increase as the population increases. there are quite a few seniors who have mental health problems but they are also, the majority of seniors, who are hard-working, who had minimum wage jobs their whole lives, who paid social security. think about living on $889 a month in the city of san francisco needing to buy medication, one meal a day, hopefully, and health care. if we could provide health care early on we might prevent (inaudible) and people would be less likely to end up in the emergency room with a drastic outcome. we could actually provide prevention and health care to people who had no other way of getting health care, those without insurance, it might be more cost effective >> hello. you're watching the show that explores san francisco's love affair with food. there are at least 18 farmers markets in san francisco alone, providing fresh and affordable to year-round. this is a great resource that does not break the bank. to show just how easy it can be to do just that, w
is preserved in the elderly, even with alzheimer's, other decay, they remember songs from their childhood when they cannot even remember their spouse's name, what year it is. music has thiese musically reinforcing views. in a good piece of music, you have the elements of rhythm, pitch, harmony, meter, articulation, timbre, all working together, so that you may not remember every note, but the ones you do remember inform the missing ones. it becomes a pattern of multiple queues. that is one thing. the other thing we found interesting from girl imaging studies -- narrow imaging studies is when you are remembering a piece of music, it activates almost identical circuits as when you are hearing it. so much so when you compare the bring activation of someone in imagining music, remembering, to someone listening, it is virtually indistinguishable by looking at the brain scan. i wonder -- and brings up the question, how did it would you say your musical imagery is? when you imagine music, is it like a little tape playing in your head? >> yes, it is. and it works the other way, from the point of view
is accused of trading on non-public information of an alzheimer's drug. and is starbucks going politically correct? shareholders vote this week on a proposal that would stop the use of corporate funds for any political election or campaign. time now to check out the monday trade with ben lichtenstein of tradersaudio.com. ben, always good to have you on this show. > > good morning. thank you. > i want to back up just a minute, though, to friday, and on friday alan greenspan was talking about the fact that he believes there is no irrational exuberance to stocks right now on cnbc. was that a buy signal, a sell signal, or no signal at all? > > i think it was a continuation of the existing buy signal for the most part. clearly this market has been establishing areas of value to the upside. one thing that traders need to be aware of is the fact that when a market moves from point a to point b, it doesn't go in a straight line, it pauses, and kind of regains strength if you will, or regains momentum, and those areas of pause are considered to be areas of value where the market trades sideways bef
up on "the five." ♪ ♪ mom was diagnosed with alzheimer's at 58 years old. eight years into the disease was when all the light went out. for me, it was heart-wrenching. look into the eyes of somebody with alzheimer's sometime, you just don't see -- the person's soul is, like, gone. bea: and it takes a toll on everyone. i mean, it's -- it's a depressing disease to watch unfold before your eyes. she actually thought those of us who were caring for her and who loved her most were her worst enemies. more and more responsibilities fell on my shoulders. lisa: this disease just ravages a family. it changes your life. the magnitude of it is indescribable. my mother taught me to be in the moment. we have to live in the moment with them. and i'm going to be with that person right now, in this moment, wherever she is. art: now is the moment. if we work together, we can stop this epidemic. grace: contact brightfocus and learn more. colleagues with "the five." ♪ ♪ >> dana: all right. pope francis' first full day on the job in vatican city today. he delivered his first mass as po
alzheimer's research and the president wants to increase alzheimer's research. so it's almost impossible to know where to start with the fact checking. i give all of the fact checkers out there a big hand for trying to do it but there are not enough columns to check that entire speech at cpac. >> you have to go back to this highlight-worthy clip from bill o'reilly. watch this. >> he has to i sa, here are the programs that are going to go down, here's how we're going to reform medicare and social security, and the man refuses to do. >> no, he doesn't. >> hold on, give me one damn program he said he would cut. one. >> he said he would cut entitlements. >> entitlements? >> why do you want to yell at sne. >> because you're lying. >> i am not lying. >> you are lying here. >> don't sit there and call me a liar. >> you are lying. >> hey, you don't like the president. you don't like what he's doing but don't sit there and call me a liar. >> i am. >> they can't handle facts. i mean, they go bazerk when confronted on the facts. they get highly irritated. they just can't handle it. >> in washington
of her relatives. she's in a nursing home in my hometown, and she has alzheimer's. and i know you asked me why am i worried about them. you know why i'm worried. they will be the victims of this proposed budget. and what's going to happen, will sabrina lose her business? lucy have top drop out of school. will ruth go hungry. will lola have to give up her work to stay home with her daughter? who is going to take care of barbara? who is going to take care of her? mrs. maloney: no one. no one. she has to quit her job and take care of barbara. ms. frankel: barbara is in no condition to take care of anybody. so, listen, we all know, the american people know that we have -- there's -- we have to get our fiscal house in order. there is a deficit problem for us, but the american people want us to solve it in a responsible manner, because they also know this, we still have a job problem out there. we have a slow economic recovery and now as we are just turning the corner, all of a sudden we have this bill, this proposal, this budget that independent analysts tell us are going to throw two millio
. this includes alzheimer's, cancer, and aides. we rely on those dollars for jobs at the ke diversity and research and businesses that are growing and innovation. the heart of american ingenuity over our history has been in manufacturing and the ability to build ridges, roads, railroads, and a community. it attracts private investment. the government dollars we provide for transportation and infrastructure are in supply exponentially. it attracts private investment. but in the face of the desired to build and grow, republicans cut such investment by 32%. the republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it puts american jobs at risk. it ignores the fact that job creation and economic growth are the most effective ways to reduce that debt and the deficit. it is a plan for economic weakness. it is a receiving vision of american greatness and innovation. it is a harsh vision for our great country. i yield back to my colleague. >> i yield to an half minutes. -- two and a half and it's. >-- minutes. >> thank you. i own a business. i understand the tough choic
aspirin, which blocks pain at the site. try the power of bayer back & body. of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious stomach problems such as bleeding may worsen. patients may experience slow heart rate. free trial offer for them. nurses to talk to for you. visit exelonpatchoffer.com. ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm singing the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up
happened and how the town is responding tonight. our cameras are there. alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious stomach problems such as bleeding may worsen. patients may experience slow heart rate. free trial offer for them. nurses to talk to for you. visit exelonpatchoffer.com. ♪ visit exelonpatchoffer.com. sometimes life can be well, a little uncomfortable. but when it's hard or hurts to go to the bathro
credit score model boosting gerri: we have john alzheimer, from smartcredit.com, joining me with details. thehree biggest credit bureaus in the country got together. why do they need yet another credit score? >> well, they banded together in 2006 and created advantage score. it is now managed by a fourth companand essentially it is a competitor model to the industry standard be one you say that they re advantages for consumers? >> yes, first off, score now ignores collections that have a 0-dollar balance, which means that the collection is paid or settled, and updated on your credit report to show that it has no balance due, the new score basically ignoreit as if it doesn't exist. which obviously, consumers are going to love an collection agencies are probably going to lovemore. because now it is an incentive to settle your collection account. the second thing that is a big deal, i think it's pretty important. they have built-in some logic into the model that protects the consumer from the effects of natural disater. there is a way for a competitor to note on a credit report consumer ha
a clinical trial for an alzheimer's drug jointly developed by elon corporation and wyeth. that $600 million is the largest ever settlement for an insider trading case. lori: jackpot. online gambling raking in $30 billion in revenue each year worldwide but only three states here in the u.s. allow it. dennis kneale here with the big push to legalize online poker in america. >> how are you doing. 10 million americans play poker on line? lori: really. >> federal government thinks this is forbidden activity. only three states legalized. senator alphonse today maut -- d'amato, senator pothole. he is for the alliance, with a nationwide federal push is needed. he figures this is time to come into the 20th century. get a listen. >> there is lots of revenue that can be raised. when we talk about the internet, we're using it for everything. imagine what we're saying is, get into the 21st century. let people play. they're playing throughout the world on the internet. and if you want to see the honest games are honest, have a regulatory system that was rather easy to set up, particularly if you set it u
on an alzheimer's drug, based on confidential test results. there was word today that u.s. senator robert menendez of new jersey is under investigation by a federal grand jury in miami. "the washington post" reported the panel is looking into his role in advocating for the business interests of a wealthy donor. the veteran democrat has already reimbursed the government for two flights he took aboard the donor's private jet. in a statement, his office said his actions have always been appropriate. the vatican is attacking claims that pope francis never confronted a brutal military dictatorship that ruled argentina from 1976 to 1983. some human rights activists say the former jorge mario bergoglio acquiesced in the face of torture and murder. but a vatican spokesman lashed out today at the allegations, calling them a defamatory, left- wing campaign. >> ( translated ): the anti- clerical accusations against bergoglio are known and obvious. they refer to a time when he wasn't yet a bishop, but a jesuit superior in argentina. it concerns two priests who were kidnapped and he allegedly did not protect.
isolated iron in their brain. and data going back to the 1970s has demonstrated that alzheimer's disease and dementia is also associated with excess brain iron. >> the trial will include 130 patients on two continent. children's hospital oakland is the only site in the u.s. the goal is to not only stop the deterioration but to reverse the effects of this devastating and deadly disease, possibly providing the first hope to families like tanner's. >> well, i hope it works and it helps all children with it. we know it's not a cure, but it will definitely be a step in the right direction. >> carolyn says the trial is being funded by both the the fda and the you're fine union of the 130 patience participating, 40 will be treated at children's hospital oakland. >>> republican senator rand paul of kentucky has won the symbol tick straw poll favoring the next presidential candidate at this week's play the cal action conference. he edged out marco rubio, and sarah palin returned taking swipes at president obama and new york mayor michael bloomberg. coming up at 8:00 abcs this week has an exclusiv
up the streets. you were running for a great cause, athletes to end alzheimer's new york city half marathon. how did it go? >> i'm very stiff walking. going up the stairs today was painful. it was a great run for a great race with a really good cause. a lot of people ran for various charities. i have a strong connection to the alzheimer's foundation. my mother-in-law has early onset alzheimer's. i think they raised $80,000, athletes to end alzheimer's. thanks to them for allowing me to run with them. we had a great time. >> did you finish? >> of course. >> i thought you retired from marathoning? >> it was a half marathon. i may do a marathon again some day. somebody may twist my arm hard enough. >> give me your arm. >> that's impressive. >> i love doing that. let's get to our takes, okay? moving on. first up, the topic we saw earlier. duchess of cambridge was asked while she was out doing the st. patrick's day ceremonies, she was honoring the irish guards there. apparently one of the guards asked her, so, what would you like to have a boy or a girl? >> i'm surprised that woe have t
demencia segÚn una asociaciÓn o contra el alzheimer, aÚn cuando no sea la causa directa de la muerte, puede ser el golpe de defintiivo, porque interifereene le uidado de las enfermedades cardiacas, cÁncer males que puede sufrir el paciente >> un terrible accidente llevo a un paciente a crear una protesis despuÉs que una explosion le arrebatara un dedo, hizo un p s plastÁstico indestructible ah r pretende crear una poiel artif c artificial para cubrirlo >> un testimonio habla de un c acto de venganza por negarse a t tener sexo con la actriz, tene o tenemos los deatlles >> en serios problemas rocio j r jurado porque el torero causo un accidente >> para seguir las noticias s siuganos en las redes sociales, estamos en facebook, twitter, y la pÁgina de primer impacto.com los esp bueno, rompio el celeste marÍa f celeste que estuvo en prision por evenenar a la actriz >> segÚn televisiÓn y notas la actriz intento a entrar a la b habitacion con intencoiens que e esalla rehazchazo, por eso dic l la envio a la cÁrcel, por eso no se presenta una denuncia >>e se tipo de connotacion
financial planner professional. cfp -- let's make a plan. of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious stomach problems such as bleeding may worsen. patients may experience slow heart rate. free trial offer for them. nurses to talk to for you. visit exelonpatchoffer.com. ♪ >> bret: now fresh pickings from the political grapevine.tun about how unfair standardized tests are. it turns out they m
still ahead. we are live from atlantic city. ♪ mom was diagnosed with alzheimer's at 58 years old. lisa: this disease just ravages a family. it changes your life. if we work together, we can stop this epidemic. now is the moment. grace: contact brightfocus and learn more. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you c't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. ♪ gerri: reality tv's certainly is a vice for many of us. as it down with one of the big ♪ gerri: end-and tonight, the business of vice and reality tv is certainly a vice for many of us. my next guest made her mark on the hit mtv series th jersey shore along with oth cast members. now she is quickly transitioning from reality starts to fashion a step. i recently asked her about the actors of the jersey shore, and she says she had no regrets. >> all the memories
past the hour. time to check our top stories. a new report from the alzheimer's association shows the disease becoming more widespread and costlier for care. the report says one in three older adults dies with alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. payments for alzheimer's care for seniors is expected to reach $1.2 trillion by midcentury. >>> last-minute preparations underway for president obama's trip to israel. he leaves later tonight. it will be the president's first visit to israel since taking office. he visited there once while campaigning back in 2008. mr. obama will spend several days meeting with israeli and palestinian leaders before wrapping up his trip on saturday in jordan. >>> and 23 years after one of the nation's biggest art robberies, the fbi is still looking for those responsible. the fbi says the statute of limitations has run out, so no one can be charged at this point. the art, which was once valued at $500 million, has never been recovered. >>> in just over one week, the supreme court weighs in on what some have called the civil rights issue of our time. i'
. zero heartburn. of mild to moderate alzheimer's disease is exelon patch. now with more treatment options, exelon patch may improve overall function and cognition. your loved one can get a free 30-day trial. and you can have access to nurses. it does not change how the disease progresses. hospitalization, and rarely death, have been reported from wearing more than one patch at a time. the most common side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fall, loss of appetite or weight, application site redness, and urinary tract infection. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases or if patients weigh less than 110 pounds. people at risk for stomach ulcers who take certain other medicines should talk to their doctor as serious stomach problems such as bleeding may worsen. patients may experience slow heart rate. free trial offer for them. nurses to talk to for you. visit exelonpatchoffer.com. ♪ >>> the politics lead. it's not what you say, it's how you say it. that might be a bottom line out of today's republican autopsy report. >> i think that
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